Photo © Michal Venera

 

August 23, 25, & 26

If you’re tired of the digital rat race and are looking for a “new” way to shoot, try returning to the roots of photography with this intensive tintype workshop.

with Nathan Lomas


Tintype photography workshop instructor Nathan Lomas is fascinated by the ambiguities and tones that tintype photography creates and its contrast to today’s digital photography. Tintype pictures are a direct-positive photographic process (also referred to as wet plate collodion) that was prevalent from the 1850s to the 1880s. The end product is a one-of-a-kind image that will last a lifetime!

 

Photo © Nathan Lomas

Photo © Nathan Lomas

 

In the introduction evening, Nathan will talk about the history of tintype photography and show examples of historic and contemporary tintypes. You will learn how the tintype process works and what to expect during the two days of intensive shooting.

 

This photography workshop will be divided into two shooting sessions. The first will focus on creating still life images to become familiar with the antique process. Students are invited to bring objects and materials that they would like to use to create a personalized still life scene. In the second session, students will have the chance to bring a small group of family or friends to create stunning tintype portraits in our studio.

 

Students will leave the workshop with an understanding of the tintype process, and 8–10 4×5 unique tintypes!

 

Class Schedule:

Thursday, August 23, 5–6PM: Introduction evening

Saturday, August 25, 10AM–2PM: Still-life session shooting tintypes

Sunday, August 26, 10AM–3PM: Portrait session shooting tintypes


Instructor Bio


instructor-nathan-lomas

Nathan Lomas hails from Buffalo, NY. He developed his passion photography at the tender age of five when his father gave him a Ricoh camera. He has a BFA from the College of Creative Studies in Detroit and an MFA in Imaging Arts from the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. He is an adjunct professor at the Academy of Art in San Francisco, owns his own photo studio in Alameda where he specializes in 19th-century tintype photography, and at The Image Flow, works with digital restoration, film scanning, and printing, as well as teaching workshops and working one-on-one with clients.