Thursday, February 5, 2014, from 7–8PM
Free

Catherine Karnow portraits
Photos © Catherine Karnow

National Geographic photographer Catherine Karnow will present her lecture, “The Art of Photographing People.”
(Read more about Catherine on our blog.)
Catherine is known for her vibrant, emotional, and sensitive style of photographing people. Throughout her 30-year career, she has photographed an impressive range of subjects, from internationally known figures to schoolchildren on the streets.
Photography has never been a job for Catherine, it is her passion, and that carries into her love for presenting and teaching. Catherine has been teaching workshops and giving lectures for almost 20 years, and she has a wealth of stories and anecdotes that will entertain as well as inform.
The secret to great portrait photography is getting to know your subjects and making a connection with them even before you pick up your camera.
“Before I travel to a foreign country, I always learn a handful of complimentary words like “beautiful” and “wonderful.” Even if they’ve agreed to be photographed, many people are uncomfortable in front of a camera and uncertain of what they should be doing, so it’s essential to be encouraging by repeating positive words,” says Catherine.
Whether you like to shoot candid images on a foreign street or portraits of family and friends, Catherine’s tips and techniques for photographing people will help you capture the personality or your subjects and improve the quality of your images.
Catherine will also teach a San Francisco photography workshop in March.
Testimonials:
“Catherine’s intuitive nature, warmth, kindness, and respect for [her] subjects and the impact [her] images have on the viewer go beyond art and beyond being an assignment.”
“As she spoke of how she tries to get photos of people, the uncertainty of their reactions … I too have been there in my travels and my photography. Catherine truly has a gift.”
“I was feeling down about photography and considering giving it up. Now I am wanting to pick up my camera again. And I have done so! I think her perspective is also extremely important for people to hear and learn about.”