NO PAST, NO FUTURE, Photo © Greta Carlstrom

Emotional Resonance in Photography: Greta Carlstrom Transcends Identity

Willamette Valley Jeffrey Martz

Of all the eras and styles in the medium’s history, art historian and photographer Jeffrey Martz is most drawn to the 19th-century amateur pictorial photographers such as Lewis Carroll, Clementina (Lady Hawarden), and Julia Margaret Cameron.

“An amateur photographer was a clearly-defined category of maker in the 19th century, someone who pursued photography seriously but not professionally. They weren’t in a studio trying to please a client, and because of this, they were free to make the best possible pictures in whatever style they wished. They did their work literally for the Latin root of the word—amore—or love,” Jeffery explained.

For the Love of Photography: Jeffrey Martz on the Amateur Spirit

Willamette Valley Jeffrey Martz

Of all the eras and styles in the medium’s history, art historian and photographer Jeffrey Martz is most drawn to the 19th-century amateur pictorial photographers such as Lewis Carroll, Clementina (Lady Hawarden), and Julia Margaret Cameron.

“An amateur photographer was a clearly-defined category of maker in the 19th century, someone who pursued photography seriously but not professionally. They weren’t in a studio trying to please a client, and because of this, they were free to make the best possible pictures in whatever style they wished. They did their work literally for the Latin root of the word—amore—or love,” Jeffery explained.

Self-Taught Teen Explores Identity Through Film Photography

arthur wechsler self portrait film photography

Arthur Wechsler discovered photography at an early age. His grandfather was a photographer in the Korean War and Arthur had one of his old cameras sitting in his room “forever.”

“One day, I think a year before he passed away, I asked for a camera, and he got me one for Christmas. I was 11 or 12 at the time,” Arthur said.

Fading Traditions: Papua New Guinea in Color

Fran Meckler Papua New Guinea documentary photography

Photographer Fran Meckler is passionate about her social documentary work—she’s visited more than 70 countries over her career. Her latest images were made during a two-week trip to Papua New Guinea where she documented in vivid color the changing landscape, the lives of many different tribes and what is still left of tribal life in the 21st century, and the mystery of that very foreign culture.

In a new exhibition at the World Affairs Council in San Francisco, Fran will show 25 images from the trip, printed by The Image Flow.

Ballerina Misty Copeland photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Don’t Miss Annie Leibovitz’s “Women” at the Presidio Through April 17

Ballerina Misty Copeland photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Annie Leibovitz, a San Francisco Art Institute alum, began her famed career as a photojournalist for Rolling Stone in the early 1970s. Over the past 40 years, she has created some of the most stunning and most controversial photographs of her day. Her new exhibition Women: New Portraits now on display at the Presidio’s Building 649 at Chrissy Field features portraits of some the world’s most influential women, from ballerina Misty Copeland to anthropologist Jane Goodall to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.

Grizzly with Salmon © Mary D'Agostino nature & landscape photographer

Mary D’Agostino: Seeking Beauty in Nature’s Fleeting Moments

Grizzly with Salmon © Mary D'Agostino nature & landscape photographer

Emerging nature and landscape photographer Mary D’Agostino is as homegrown as much of her work. A busy executive by day, Mary used to spend her vacations painting wildlife, but in recent years, she has developed a passion for photography. She put herself through a “school of photography” taking workshops and classes at The Image Flow and started working one-on-one with Stuart. “I was doing projects and shooting a lot, and I would routinely bring my work in for critique from Stuart.”

Mary has also sought critiques from experts in the field of nature photography, which have been met with increasing success. “I’m fearless when it comes to finding people in the field of photography to evaluate my photographs,” she says.

film photography Zac Mosher processes his black and white images at The Image Flow

Growing Up In the Digital Age, Zac Mosher Loves to Shoot Film

film photography Zac Mosher processes his black and white images at The Image Flow

Zac Mosher, a 14-year-old student at Mill Valley Middle School, has been spending several hours per week in the darkroom at The Image Flow for the past six months processing and printing his black and white images.

“I actually started shooting film after I started with digital, but I wasn’t super into photography at the time,” he says. Later, he discovered his mom’s old cameras while going through a storage unit with his parents. “I thought they were really cool. So I got the cameras and went out and got some film. That’s what really sparked my interest.”

Gary Yost to Premier New Film about Mt. Tamalpais, Featuring the Work of Artist Genna Panzarella

Gary Yost to Premier Film about Mt. Tamalpais, Featuring the Work of Artist Genna Panzarella

Gary Yost to Premier Mt Tamalpais film, Featuring the Work of Artist Genna Panzarella

Photographer and filmmaker Gary Yost will present a series of short films at the O’Hanlon Center for the Arts including the premier of his new project, Mountains Made of Chalk, Fall into the Sea, Eventually The film features the work of artist Genna Panzarella, who paints a 10-foot-wide mural of Mt. Tamalpais as it was when it was whole—literally inside what used to be the mountaintop. The film will premier with Gary’s new series about Mill Valley at a special event at the O’Hanlon Center for the Arts on Thursday, April 2 at 7PM.

Anthony Fendler Catherine Karnow exhibition-quality printing Vietnam retrospective

Ink on Paper: Catherine Karnow Exhibits 25 Years of Vietnam

Anthony Fendler Catherine Karnow exhibition-quality printing Vietnam retrospective

Photographer Catherine Karnow has made a name for herself shooting surprising and thought-provoking images of Vietnam since 1990. Her new retrospective will open at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club in Hong Kong March 9.

Catherine is well known in Vietnam: She began shooting in the country in 1990, and calls the late General Giap a personal friend. In 1994, she was the only foreign journalist invited to accompany him privately to Dien Bien Phu, the site of the battle that won Vietnam independence from the French.

Evelyn at the well, Lbaa Onyokia

Documentary Photographer Rudi Dundas on The Face of Water

Evelyn at the well, Lbaa Onyokia

This month, The Face of Water, a series of portraits by Rudi Dundas that tells the stories of people affected by the lack of clean drinking water, opens at the World Affairs Council in San Francisco. On February 26, Rudi will give a lecture about the images at The Image Flow.

Matt Black Former cotton migrant at home Teviston, CA

Matt Black: Documenting the Social Implications of Modern Farming

Matt Black Former cotton migrant at home Teviston, CA

From southern Mexico to rural California, Matt Black documents the social issues of modern farming and the effects of one of the most severe droughts in recorded history.

Matt Black began photographing the small towns and expansive farmlands of California’s Central Valley for nearly 20 years. A native of that vast agricultural area that runs nearly the entire length of the state, Matt says he began to notice a shift in the people working the fields around his home town.

Gary Yost, Full moon, Mt Tam Radome

Gary Yost: West Peak, The Project, Part 3

Gary Yost, Full moon, Mt Tam Radome

Landscape time-lapse video requires movement to be interesting. That’s usually accomplished by motion control and (more importantly) dramatic moving light in the form of clouds and shadows. In the Bay Area that means winter is our window to shoot time-lapse of any weather besides fog. (As I demonstrated in my Day in the Life of a Fire Lookout video<, fog can be a great subject but when you’re on top of a mountain and pointing the camera upwards it doesn’t help much.)I began shooting for the West Peak project in late December and by early January I had learned a lot about what I need to do to get the shots I want. The West Peak area I’m working in is between 2450 and 2530 feet in elevation and when the cloud ceiling is just around that height the scene becomes very dramatic. The sight of the clouds rolling across the landscape and breaking to reveal the Marin headlands provides strong visual cues that we are on the top of a mountain.

Gary Yost, West Peak Project

Gary Yost: West Peak: The Project, Part 2

Gary Yost, West Peak Project

Photographer and filmmaker Gary Yost writes about his project to document the history of the lost West Peak of Mt. Tamalpais.

Over the past two months I’ve been busy conducting initial tests of new motion-control equipment I’ve acquired for creating the time-lapse portion of the project. One of my frustrations with the two-foot slider I used in the Fire Lookout piece is that it wasn’t long enough to provide enough visual parallax cues to make larger scenes look three-dimensional. These parallax cues are essential to providing an immersive sense of the scene because when the camera is moving, closer objects will move across your visual field much more quickly than objects farther away. When shooting basic time-lapse sequences you can easily lock the camera down on a tripod and shoot a frame every few seconds. That’s easy to do, but to get parallax effects you need to mount the camera on a motorized slider that will move it a fraction of an inch after every shot. This technique was invented by Ron Fricke in the late 1970s for the groundbreaking film Koyannisqatsi, and then refined for his later masterpieces, Chronos, Baraka, and 2012’s Samsara.

What’s happening at The Flow?

Here are just a few of the things that are keeping us busy.

EVENTS

The Jones Family by Liz Hingley, on behalf of Save The Children The Jones Family by Liz Hingley, on behalf of Save The Children

The Image Flow hosted the live judging of PhotoPhilanthropy’s Activists Awards on Saturday. It was a full and fascinating day! Close to 50 photo essays were critiqued and culled down to finalists by a panel of 5 impressive judges: Margaret Aquirre, Phil Borges, Alexa Dilworth, John Isaac & Denise Wolff.  A winner and 2 finalists were awarded in each of these three categories:  Amateur, Student and Professional. Liz Hingley’s image (above) was part of a series that won The Activists Award in the Professional Category.

West Peak: The Project by Gary Yost

Gary Yost
Photographer and filmmaker Gary Yost writes about his project to document the history of the lost West Peak of Mt. Tamalpais.

I am a Mill Valley-based photographer and filmmaker who likes to tell stories, big and small. Over the years I’ve been fortunate to be a part of some very interesting local community activities.

One of my 2012 projects was to document what a day in the life of a fire lookout on the East Peak of Mt. Tamalpais is like. I created it primarily as a recruitment piece for the Marin County Fire Department, but it saw much wider distribution as a testimony to the beauty of our mountain. There are a number of reasons for its popularity but I think the two biggest are that it shows an aspect of the mountain that nobody has seen before and it uses time-lapse techniques to illustrate how time passes in a way that we can’t see with our naked eyes.